Navigate

Heroin Facts

  • Sharing of injection equipment or fluids can lead to some of the most severe consequences of heroin abuse - infections with hepatitis B and C, HIV, and a host of other blood-borne viruses, which drug abusers can then pass on to their sexual partners and children.
  • Injection continues to be the predominant method of heroin use among addicted users seeking treatment; however, researchers have observed a shift in heroin use patterns, from injection to sniffing and smoking.
  • According to the National Household Survey for 1994, 2.2 million Americans have tried heroin; 191,000 had used it in the previous 30 days.
  • Short-term effects of heroin include: warm flushing of the skin, dry mouth, slurred speech, constricted pupils and droopy eyelids, as well as itchy skin.

Heroin Withdrawal

Heroin addiction withdrawal symptoms are some of the nastiest an addict can experience compared to addiction withdrawal from any other drug. The individual who has become physically as well as psychologically dependent on heroin will experience heroin addiction withdrawal with an abrupt discontinuation of use or even a decrease in their daily amount of heroin taken. The onset of heroin addiction withdrawal symptoms begin six to eight hours after the last dose is administrated. Major heroin withdrawal symptoms peak between 48 and 72 hours after the last dose of heroin and subdue after about one week. The symptoms of heroin withdrawal produced are similar to a bad case of the flu.

Symptoms of Heroin withdrawal include but are not limited to:

  • dilated pupils
  • piloerection (goose bumps
  • watery eyes
  • runny nose
  • yawning
  • loss of appetite
  • tremors
  • panic
  • chills
  • nausea
  • muscle cramps
  • insomnia
  • stomach cramps
  • diarrhea
  • vomiting
  • shaking
  • chills or profuse sweating
  • irritability
  • jitterness
© 2003 - 2012 | heroinaddictiondrugrehab.com | All Rights Reserved.